Notifications

Login or Register

You are not logged in. In order to create slideshows you must have an account.

×
Password
Forgot your password? Don't have an account?

×

×

    Add Slideshow

    × 200

    × Success

    Alberta Factbook: Renewable Energy

    TEXT

    Larger Larger Smaller Smaller

    This infographic about different types of renewable energy is from the Alberta Factbook.

     

     

     

    Download the PDF in the Learning Activity to learn more about Alberta's renewable energy sources...

    For more information on Alberta's energy mix, click on the other Factbook pages linked here...

    Download the PDF in the Learning Activity to learn more about Alberta's renewable energy sources.

    For more information on Alberta's energy mix, click on the other Factbook pages linked here.

    Unlike fossil fuels, which are found only wherever a fluke of millions of years of geology has left them, renewable energy sources, such as wind, hydroelectricity and biomass (organic material, such as trees, agricultural byproducts and municipal waste, that can be burned or converted into biofuel to produce energy) can be found wherever the wind blows, rivers flow or crops grow. Fortunately for Alberta, the province is blessed with abundant fossil fuel resources and plenty of wind, water and biomass, too.

    Alberta has more than 20 hydroelectric dams and generating plants on the province’s five main river basins: the Athabasca basin, the North Saskatchewan basin, the Peace basin, the Slave basin and the South Saskatchewan basin. However, only a very small amount of Alberta’s electric energy comes from hydro power, with coal still meeting the majority of Albertans’ electricity needs.

    Alberta is the birthplace of wind energy in Canada, with enough wind turbines scattered along ridges and plains in the southern half of the province to potentially power almost one million homes when the wind is blowing. The province also produces biomass energy, with a total installed capacity of about 417 megawatts. Feedstocks, such as agricultural products, (like corn and canola crops), forestry waste and livestock waste are burned to produce heat or converted into biofuels such as ethanol, biodiesel and biogas.

    Source:

    Canadian Geographic

    Show Me More [+] Show Me Less [–]

    Alberta Energy Production
    Alberta River Basins
    ×

    Contact Us

    Contact us with any questions or concerns