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    Geothermal: Heating and cooling buildings

    demand

    Author: Siobhan McClelland, Canadian Geographic

    Publish Date: Oct 9, 2013   Last Update: Sep 20, 2018

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    Geothermal energy is heat within the earth and is a renewable energy source because heat is continuously produced inside the earth.

    Manitoba has assisted over 1000 Manitobans install geothermal systems in their homes and buildings through financial incentives of over $3 million.

    Geothermal energy exists in the form of heat from the Earth’s core and can be harnessed to directly heat homes and buildings and produce electricity.

    Some of Canada’s earliest uses of geothermal energy were in Banff, Alta., where water from natural hot springs was used in plunge baths and a swimming pool.

    Geothermal energy is already used to heat and cool homes and buildings in Canada. Usually, heat pumps extract thermal energy near the surface through underground pipes and pump heat through the building. The heat pumps can also reverse the process to cool structures.

     

    Source:

    www.centreforenergy.com

    www.greenbang.com

    thinkgeoenergy.com

    www.cangea.ca

    www1.eere.energy.gov

    teeic.anl.gov

    OCT 9, 2013 | TRANSMISSION

    Geothermal: Heat pumps and transmission lines

    To heat or cool a building using geothermal energy, heat pump systems transmit warm and cold fluid along pipes throughout a structure. To generate electricity, geothermal power plants use equipment similar to that used in more traditional plants.

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    OCT 9, 2013 | PRODUCTION

    Geothermal: Heat from the ground up

    In Canada, heat pumps are used to harness geothermal energyto heat and cool buildings, called direct use. In Toronto, more than 100buildings, including the Air Canada Centre, use an open-loop geothermal airconditioning system.

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